Misleading Advertising

Click here to view original web page at www.shotinthedark.info

In a state with functioning truth in advertising laws, the DFL would be forced the change its name from the “Democrat Farmer Labor” to the “Democrat Public Employee” party.

The DFL’s numbers among private-sector labor unions have been eroding for decades. That’s the subject of another post.

But the DFL’s support in rural Minnesota has pretty much collapsed. The DFL lost the First CD, and likely will not get it back anytime soon. The 7th – aka “East Dakota” – has always been a positive GOP district for every office other than state Representative; Trump took the district by nearly a three-digit margin. And if Colin Peterson ever retires, it will never vote DFL again. Ever.

And the reversal in the 8th – as the DFL, a wholly owned and operated subsidiary of the Metro public employee/big progressive money/environmentalist racket, continues its generations-long stomping on the mining industry – appears to be nearly complete; the district, a DFL sinecure up to the last decade and blue enough to toss Chip Cravaack for Rick Nolan’s re-animated head in a jar, went for Trump by two digits and sent Pete Stauber to Congress.

So in the parts of Minnesota where people respond “the Met what ?” when the Met Council is brought up, the DFL is about as politically current and on point as a Beach Boys tour.

Which perhaps is behind Speaker Melissa Hortman’s faintly desperate-sounding kumbaya op-ed last week in the Strib, “Minnesota’s Urban-Rural Divide is a Myth“.

Minnesotans have a lot in common with each other. We care about our neighbors and our shared future. We want to see everyone succeed in our communities. No matter our differences, including where we live, we all want good jobs that can support our families, good schools for our children, clean air to breathe, clean water to drink and affordable, high-quality health care.

MIners in CD8 might well be wondering when that concern for their “good jobs” is going to materialize.

And given that Democrats in Minnesota as nationwide are quintupling down on the same identity politics that performed so well for HIllary Clinton three years ago, this next paragraph should insult the intelligence of even Hortman’s base, to say nothing of readers with critical thinking skills:

There are those who seek to divide us. Some people seek to score political points by contending that there is an “us” and a “them” in Minnesota. Some people focus on what they contend divides us — whether that’s geography, race, religion, national origin or some other characteristic — rather than focusing on the values that unite us. (“Minnesota’s urban-rural divide is no lie,” July 28; “I’d like to expand on my thanks to the president,” Oct 15; “The Twin Cities don’t speak for the entire state,” Nov. 11.)

Now, I’m not going to say that the DFL has spent the last decade or so trying to create a cultural civil war between the Blue and Red parts of Minnesota, with its:

But if the D”F”L were trying to wage a cultural red-blue civil war, I’m at a loss to think about what they’d be doing differently.

But as our friend Gary Gross at Let Freedom Ring points out, the proof of the DFL’s urban-uber-alles philosophy isn’t just in their numbers, their policy, their legislative priorities or their results.

It’s in their org chart:

Of the 7-person DFL Senate leadership team, 1 person is from northwest Minnesota (Kent Eken) and another person (Tom Bakk) is from northeast Minnesota. The other 5 people (Susan Kent, who is challenging Bakk for Minority Leader, Jeffrey Hayden, Carolyn Laine, John Hoffman and Ann Rest) are from the Twin Cities.

And that’s the Senate – where the DFL has to “moderate” their approach, being in a slight minority.

And I eirect you back to their 2018 state convention, where the activists in the party advanced a “crazies-only” slate; Erin Murphy, Erin Maye-Quade for Governor and Lieutenant Governoer, Matt Pelikan for Attorney General and the rest. It remained for the DFL’s statewide voters to opt for the – this is rich – more “moderate” Tim Walz and Keith Ellison in the primaries.

Nope. No catastrophic urban focus there.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized by Mitch Berg. Bookmark the permalink.