Fun facts

Click here to view original web page at bradley1969.blogspot.com

Say, have you heard how cold it is in the Twin Cities?????

For the past couple of days, my Facebook feed has been a glut of photos with the temperature reading of Minneapolis side-by-side with that of Antarctica's temp. In most cases it shows how Minnesota's air temp is actually colder than in the Arctic.

Look, I understand why so many folks choose to post such a thing. It's a coping mechanism, as if to say "If we're going to suffer we might as well have a chuckle in doing so." Well, I hate to burst everyone's bubble (BAH! No I don't), but it's not an apples-to-apples comparison. In fact, this time of year may be the most desirable time frame to travel to Antarctica.

December to Early February: December and January are the months with the most sunlight (up to 20 hours a day), and daily temperatures are at their warmest. In January, temperatures at the Peninsula average 34 Fahrenheit. Penguins begin hatching and wildlife, especially penguin chicks, is most plentiful during this time of year.

Mid-February and March: Late summer in Antarctica, February and early March, is the best time to spot whales. However, you are taking the risk that other wildlife may already be gone out to sea. By March, the chicks are quite large, and they start to fledge. Weather wise, temperatures are beginning to drop as the season starts to change. Daily highs average roughly 29 Fahrenheit on the Peninsula. There tend to be less vessels operating at this time, which means you won't have to compete with other ships for landings. This time of year you are also likely to have better access to areas further south as polar ice melts. You will rarely walk on snow during this time; expect rocky and muddy landings.

via GIPHY

-------------------------------------------------------