Giving away our seed corn

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"Any cyber expert will tell you the attacks are getting more frequent and much more sophisticated. Whether it is your personal information at home, or company information you are tasked to protect, you cannot be too cautious."

Interesting article this morning about how this country continues to hemorrhage our national treasure due to intellectual property theft. And how does that happen? For starters, blame the ubiquitous "cloud". Okay - maybe that is too harsh. Cloud computing and storage have not been around forever. But intellectual theft sure has. Which begs the question, what is intellectual theft, anyhow?
Back in my working days, one of the things I was tasked with besides negotiating and administering contracts, was the control of the company's intellectual property. Not all of it, just what was within my purview. In fact, while at my last two companies, I was also asked to give intellectual training to organizations we were dealing with. Ones we traded, under the aegis of a proprietary information exchange agreement, certain trade secrets with.
When I first received my intellectual training from the corporate attorney at the company I worked at in the 1980's, his definition of intellectual property was very clean and easy. He said there are two types of markings which should denote the distribution on any piece of company correspondence. "Company (the name of your company) Confidential", for all information which needs to "stay inside the tent". In other words, in no way should that information ever get outside the company confines unless protected by an iron clad information exchange agreement.
An ever more restrictive marking is "Company (the name of your company) Restricted". That document should NEVER go outside the company tent. Ever. And the "restricted" is for only a finite set of names.
Back to the theft of our intellectual property. Once a design is complete on some new product, the drawings (usually down to level 3) are stored electronically. All the product development costs which went into those drawings are now at risk. What I can't understand is this - in this day of state of the art encryption and decryption, why we can not get "military type" encryption to protect this information.
However, even the best encryption cannot defeat sloppy handling of information. If does take much - only one misstep and the most valuable of information can end up "in the wind". And once it is "in the wind", you must assume it has been compromised.
Any cyber expert will tell you the attacks are getting more frequent and much more sophisticated. Whether it is your personal information at home, or company information you are tasked to protect, you cannot be too cautious. As much as I hate to say it, the bad guys are out there, and their numbers are growing. Where do they hide? Either in plain sight, on cyber farms, or in the dark web. Have a care folks, have a care.