Top-down health care, Part II

I wrote this post about why the Affordable Care Act, aka the ACA, is failing. Here’s part of the explanation for the ACA’s unpopularity:

The problem is that the Obamcare plans aren’t attractive to consumers. They were designed in Washington to suit political prerogatives rather than being designed in the marketplace to meet the demands of consumers.

Simply put, the ACA’s biggest problem is that politicians imposed their will on health care consumers rather than finding out what people wanted. Keep that in mind while reading this LTE:

Why are so many afraid of a single-payer program that would save them money and provide better care? Why do they cling to a for-profit system that leaves 47 million Americans with no insurance and millions more with substandard coverage that lets insurance companies choose which procedures to allow and which to deny?

There are 4 questions contained in that paragraph. Let’s take them in order:

Q: Why are so many afraid of a single-payer program that would save them money and provide better care?
A: People heard that claim before. Specifically, that’s the promise President Obama and then-Speaker Pelosi made to the American people. Another thing they promised was that the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, would cost less than $1,000,000,000,000. Still another thing they promised is that it wouldn’t “add a penny to the debt.” I could go on but the point’s been made. Something that’s too good to be true shouldn’t be trusted.

Q: Why do they cling to a for-profit system that leaves 47 million Americans with no insurance?
A: Profits make the world go round. The notion that government will treat people with care is foolishness. That isn’t to say that the system we had until the ACA’s implementation was flawless. Nothing was done to help people with pre-existing conditions, aka PECs. A solution for that was clearly needed. The dirty little secret, though, was that a solution to that problem could’ve happened without tearing the previous system apart.

Q: Why do they cling to a for-profit system that leaves 47 million Americans with no insurance and millions more with substandard coverage?
A: Who determines what’s substandard coverage? I certainly don’t want this administration determining that. They’re the idiots that insisted that 30-somethings buy policies with ambulatory coverage. They’re the idiots that insisted that 60-year-old men needed policies that included pregnancy coverage. The question that this LTE doesn’t answer is why people, after meeting with their physician, shouldn’t make those decisions. The answer is simple. Health care reform, whether it’s the ACA or a single-payer system, isn’t about health care reform. It’s about getting control of a major part of every person’s life.

Q: Why do people cling to a system that…lets insurance companies choose which procedures to allow and which to deny?
A: In a system that has insurance companies competing for people’s business, people always have the option of opting for a different company if their insurance company says no. When government is the only game in town, they can tell people which procedures they’ll pay for and which ones they won’t. In that system, there aren’t options if (when?) the government says no. At that point, the patient doesn’t have another option.

If you think that couldn’t happen, think again. The ACA empowers a panel called the Independent Payment Advisory Board, aka IPAB, to make those determinations. IPAB’s determinations are made based on QALYs, aka Quality-Adjusted Life Years. If these bureaucrats decide you’re old and the treatment costs more than the government says you’re worth, the procedure is denied.

That isn’t speculation. It’s part of the ACA.

Does that sound like the actions of a benevolent government? I’m not defending the insurance companies. I’m just highlighting the fact that government is just as dictatorial as the insurance companies.

Look at the IRS’s recent history of asking conservatives for transcripts of the speeches they’ve given at TEA Party rallies. Look at the administration’s lies that the IRS scandal only involved agents at the Cincinnati office. Think about how the Justice Department threatened a reporter with a felony indictment if he didn’t tell the DOJ who leaked the information to him.

Those aren’t the actions of a benevolent government. They’re the actions of a vindictive administration that’s willing to use the government’s tools to suppress their political opponents.

That isn’t the exhaustive list of reasons why we shouldn’t trust a single-payer plan but it’s certainly an extensive list of why we shouldn’t trust government to run America’s health care system.

Here’s the other reason we shouldn’t trust them:

This Minnesota family is a young married couple with three children. Until ObamaCare and Dayton’s MNsure came along they shared the cost of their Blue Cross-Blue Shield family health insurance policy 50/50 with the father’s employer. Thanks to ObamaCare, the cost of that policy skyrocketed and is no longer affordable to the family. After endless hours of working with MNsure, here is what resulted.

Without the parent’s consent, MNsure jammed their three children onto government insurance. The children are now covered by Medicaid at no cost to the family or employer, but 100 percent cost to the taxpayers. The father had to go with a single insurance plan from his employer and purchase a separate new policy for his wife.

There isn’t a chance that an employer would pick a plan where the insurance company offered this awful of a plan. Only the government could offer a ‘solution’ like that, then insist that the policy the family had before was substandard. What are the odds this family would agree with the government that they’re better off now than they were prior to the ACA? I’d rate the odds as nil.