Demolishing MiningTruth’s Credibility

Kathryn Hoffman’s op-ed is littered with half-truths, irrelevancies and distortions. Here’s an example: Sulfide mines have a long record of polluting surrounding lakes, rivers, streams and groundwater with mercury, acid mine drainage and toxic metals. Mines proposed in Minnesota would pose risks to some of our most important water resources such as Lake Superior and the Boundary Waters.

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Almanac Roundtable Fatigue Factor

Friday night’s Almanac Roundtable was noteworthy for what wasn’t discussed. Dan Hofrenning, Kathryn Pearson and David Schultz delivered their usual uninformative amount of drivel. Cathy Wurzer and Eric Eskola asked the usual bland questions. Profound statements were nowhere to be found. That isn’t exactly noteworthy or surprising. What’s noteworthy, though not surprising, is the fact that the panel didn’t talk about Friday morning’s lackluster jobs report. Friday morning’s jobs report, along with al-Qa’ida’s startling resurrection and the IRS scandal widening, was the week’s biggest news. Despite those important stories, the focus of last night’s discussion centered on the GOP’s civil war.

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A Tale of 2 Jobs Reports

Here’s Alan Krueger’s post about the economy: While more work remains to be done, today’s employment report provides further confirmation that the U.S. economy is continuing to recover from the worst downturn since the Great Depression. It is critical that we remain focused on pursuing policies to speed job creation and expand the middle class, as we continue to dig our way out of the deep hole that was caused by the severe recession that began in December 2007.

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When will the wheels come off?

When Democrats pushed through the PPACA, they relied heavily on unions and government employees to provide the propaganda. Now that it’s supposedly on the verge of getting implemented, many of those allies are turning on the administration. In fact, they’re doing what private employers have started doing. They’re limiting their employees’ hours: School districts in states like Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Utah, Nebraska, and Indiana are dropping to part-time status school workers such as teacher aides, administrators, secretaries, bus drivers, gym teachers, coaches and cafeteria workers. Cities or counties in states like California, Indiana, Kansas, Texas, Michigan and Iowa are dropping to part-time status government workers such as librarians, secretaries, administrators, parks and recreation officials and public works officials.

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Unqualified Teachers Still Teaching

This article tells the story about how unqualified teachers are ruining Minnesota’s education system: More than 900 Minnesota teachers over the past five years have violated licensing rules aimed at making sure that children get a proper education, including 62 instructors who taught with no license at all, according to a Star Tribune analysis of state education records. The violations, which mostly involved instructors teaching the wrong subject or grade level, touched as many as 57,000 students in some 300 public school districts and charter schools across Minnesota, records show.

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Judge dismisses child care unionization lawsuit

A federal judge dismissed 2 lawsuits in-home child care small businesses filed after Gov. Dayton signed the bill into law. Here’s part of what the judge wrote of the dismissal: Chief Judge Michael Davis wrote the “plaintiffs express a fear that, one day, there may be a certified union for family child care providers who accept State subsidies and that, one day, such a union may decide to impose a fair share fee on nonmembers of the union… Plaintiffs request that the Court peer into a crystal ball, predict the future, and then opine on the constitutionality of a speculative scenario…Courts may not give such advisory opinions. Plaintiffs’ claims are not ripe.”

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