Only 11% of ObamaCare signups previously uninsured?

Remember when the uninsured in America contributed to the “fierce urgency of now” that demanded that the federal government seize control of health insurance? Only with top-down federal control of that market would those uninsured gain coverage. Since that was the case, we should expect that the new enrollees sign-ups would tilt heavily toward the uninsured. Instead, the Wall Street Journal reports, they may be as low as 11% of sign-ups (via United Liberty):

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We Finally Know Where the Buck Stops in Benghazi

Normally, when Congress undertakes an investigation of the executive branch, the committee heading the probe will issue two versions of the findings – one for each party. Partisans on both sides use the political process of oversight to either defend their own or to make hay about their opponents, and astute observers can usually find truth by reading both and looking somewhere in between. Rare are those investigations within the normal committees on Capitol Hill that issue a bipartisan report – and one that condemns an administration for its incompetence. That’s not to say that the Senate Intelligence Committee report on the failures surrounding the attack on our consulate in Benghazi, resulting in the death of Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans, is entirely free from partisan arguments.  Read More at: Fiscal Times

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SCOTUS reviews recess appointments in arguments today

The Supreme Court might have a light workload this year, but not today.  It will hear oral arguments in two key cases [see update below], both of which might have long-lasting impact on politics, and one which has significant reach on First Amendment speech rights in the public square.  The headliner today will be the arguments over the recess appointments made by Barack Obama to the NLRB while the Senate considered itself in session — a case which lower courts used to drastically shrink recess-appointment power:

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WaPo: Get ready for the second wave of ObamaCare market disruptions

Over the weekend, it seems as though the national media finally figured out what most ObamaCare critics have predicted all along.  On Friday night, the New York Times covered the mess made by the law’s incompetent implementation with providers and insurers, leaving consumers holding the bag.  By Saturday night, the Washington Post had deduced that this was just the entrée. A much bigger wave of disruption will hit when the employer mandates go into effect for 2015 (via Instapundit):

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NYT: Yeah, ObamaCare has made the healthcare system a mess in 2014

The Associated Press first reported this developing and completely predictable problem earlier in the week. What happens when you pass a law that (a) causes the health-insurance cancellation for millions and then (b) forces them and millions more to use a disastrously-built web portal as a middeman to replace that coverage? Answer: You end up with millions of people flooding into providers without any idea whether they have coverage or whether their doctor will accept it. The New York Times confirmed this issue … for its Saturday edition, of course:

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Gallup shows workforce participation rate declining to two-year low

The latest information on job creation doesn’t paint a very optimistic picture.  We’ll start with the sunnier metric, the weekly initial jobless claims report, which shows the number of claims dropping back into the pre-holiday range: In the week ending January 4, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 330,000, a decrease of 15,000 from the previous week’s revised figure of 345,000. The 4-week moving average was 349,000, a decrease of 9,750 from the previous week’s revised average of 358,750. The advance seasonally adjusted insured unemployment rate was 2.2 percent for the week ending December 28, unchanged from the prior week’s unrevised rate. The advance number for seasonally adjusted insured unemployment during the week ending December 28 was 2,865,000, an increase of 50,000 from the preceding week’s revised level of 2,815,000. The 4-week moving average was 2,872,250, an increase of 18,750 from the preceding week’s revised average of 2,853,500.

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