Threshold

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Joe Doakes from Como Park emails:

We complain that young people act like children. Why shouldn’t they?

A Minnesota resident can start having sex and get a driver’s license at 16, abortions and cigarettes at 18, and liquor and beer at 21; but he doesn’t have to get his own health insurance until 26.

Is that when he’s finally grown-up enough to be responsible for taking care of himself? Is that when he becomes an “adult?” Why would anybody want to be an adult when all the good stuff is available to kids?

Want to reform behavior? Make the ages all the same and vigorously enforce the law. No fun until you’re an adult in all respects.

Now, what age should that be?

Joe Doakes

When they can pay their own rent for a year without help. Could be 17, could be 35.

In an unrelated matter? The whole notion of “fetal viability” in the abortion debate is a red herring. A “fetus” isn’t vital until it can get a job, a place of its own, and start its own 401K.


The Monday, April 10 NPR Morning Edition piece on Richard Florida and “creative class” workers leaving the rest of the city behind. It’s he that is largely behind one of the Big Left’s current conceits; that briniging “the creative class” to big cities will revolutionize them, bringing them a new lease on life.

How’s it working?

From an NPR interview with Steve Inskeep:

Richard Florida promotes what he calls the creative class. He has said for years that cities prosper when they attract upscale innovators and entrepreneurs. Make your city a place where the creative class wants to live, and they, in turn, will create jobs.

INSKEEP: Many cities followed that advice. And now Richard Florida faces the downside. The creative class, he says, is creating cities that are massively unequal.

Well, there’s a freaking shock.

Manufacturing plants create several jobs in the area for each job actually in the plant; truckers, waitresses, janitors, HVAC contractors, management consultants, contractors, you name it.

Ad agencies don’t.

RICHARD FLORIDA: …Which is terrifying to me. The middle class in this country has declined. But, more importantly to me, the middle-class neighborhoods, those platforms for the American dream, have been decimated.

Of course, if you read this blog you are a solid decade ahead of the typical NPR listener. It was in 2007 that Joel Kotkin foresaw all of this; the fact that the middle class is decamping to the third-tier exurbs, and to smaller and middle-sized cities. Major cities are turning into an inner core of the wealthy, surrounded by formerly middle-class areas that the social service buearucracy has taken over to warehouse the poor.

Of course, NPR, being a PR wing of the Democrat party, knows who not to blame if it wants its belly rubbed (emphasis added):

INSKEEP: And that metric is especially bad in big, progressive, otherwise successful cities. Those cities are often led by Democratic mayors who criticize inequality…Have progressive policies failed those places?

FLORIDA: I think we’ve abandoned progressive policies. We’ve had an incredibly daunting and troubling reaction. I had to rewrite this entire book in the wake of Trump’s election. I mentioned, you know, I had called for a federal urban policy. I had called for the newly-elected Democratic administration to appoint a council of cities, you know, of great mayors to deploy federal resources.

Can you imagine? Bill DeBlasio, Rahm Emanuel and Betsy Hodges getting together to “deploy” even more money?

The article gets even more out of touch. You’re on your own.