Such A Deal

Now, let me see if I understand this deal correctly.  Iran gets immediate relief from the sanctions that were supposed to be holding back their nuclear weapons program.  They get to keep, rather than destroy, several tons of weapons-grade material they have already created, useless for "peaceful purposes,” and they get to keep and even enhance their ability to make more.  They get a "signing bonus" of something like $150 billion to use any way they want, including purchase of conventional weapons, purchase or development of [nuclear] missile capability, and continued or expanded support for international terrorism, with not even a promise to do otherwise.  Of course they DO have to submit to "inspections" of their nuclear sites, but they get to decide which sites are off-limits, to delay inspections up to 24 days, and then they get to name their own inspectors!  They do not even have to disclose what progress they have made towards a nuclear bomb, when the whole idea here was to keep them "one year away."  And after 10 years even that restriction goes away, which means Iran certainly gets a nuclear bomb 11 years from now, unless they cheat during that time, or unless they have enough material to build one already.  Heckuva deal.

Oh, and we get?  Ah, yes, a handful of wonderful magic beans.

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The NARN Closer - 08/23/2015

This afternoon will be my final broadcast in the Patriot bunker as I will be live at the MN State Fair over the next two weeks. Be sure to tune in to The Closer today from 1:00 until 3:00 PM Central Time.

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GOP health care plans should go bold, or go home

This week, an odd contretemps brewed briefly as Republican presidential candidates unveiled (or in Marco Rubio’s case, re-unveiled) their health-care plans. Bobby Jindal blasted Scott Walker’s plan as trading one entitlement for another, even though the differences between Walker’s tax credit structure and Jindal’s use of deductions is much smaller than either’s similarity to ObamaCare, which all propose to replace. The Washington Examiner editorial board offers a much-needed sense of perspective on the debate:

Walker’s and Rubio’s plans, as well as that of Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, would undo that crucial part of damage from Obamacare, allowing insurers to tailor plans (no more forced maternity coverage for 70 year-olds) and permit more flexible arrangements like miniature plans. They would also break the state regulatory monopoly on insurance licensing, so that New Jerseyans can buy plans that sell in Iowa for a fraction of the prices they must currently pay. This already makes all of their plans superior not only to Obamacare, but also to what existed before it.

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Symmetrical warfare in a asymmetrical world

"You name it, we have it! A knock down, drag out military with the latest and greatest weapons!"
 

One of the biggest knocks I have heard about our military as of late is we have spend most of our dollars developing a stockpile of hi-tech weapons to fight a symmetrical war. And yes, we might have one some day with Iran, North Korea, Russia or even China. But many, myself included, believe the next war will be a continuation of our current war - the War on Terror. And that war is far from symmetrical. It is a classic case of asymmetrical warfare.

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The Gold King Mine Fiasco: What It Tells Us About the EPA

We have written here and here about the EPA-caused spill of three million gallons of toxic liquid into the Animas River in Colorado. Private companies that have caused environmental disasters of that magnitude (or much less) have been criminally prosecuted; in some cases, individuals have been jailed. Will the EPA face similar accountability? Just kidding.

At Watts Up With That?, Paul Driessen has an excellent update on the Gold King mine disaster. This is what happened:

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Our Hometown Nuke...

"Love it or hate it, it is ours. And it supplies about 10% of our juice to Xcel Energy customers in the upper Midwest..." 

Yes, we have one. Right up here in God's country, we have a nuke. And it has been here for a while. Like, since 1971. That would make it about 44 years old. But whether you love it or hate it, we need it. It does not supply all of our juice up here, but certainly enough to make it hurt should it be shut down. 

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Royalty Doesn’t Need Feedback

The Saint Paul Public Schools are discontinuing TV broadcasts of the “public feedback” segment of school board meetings.

Let’s make sure we’re clear on what we’re talking about here; the public feedback part of the meeting is about half an hour, starting at 5:30 (which is a brutally difficult time to make, for people who have day jobs), during which the School Board deigns to allow commoners to address it, in slices of three minutes, while they converse amongst themselves or pretty visibly try to fight nodding off.  I did it a few years ago; you could tell that most of the board would rather have been getting a root canal.

But people watched those session via cable -and occasionally they drew blood:

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Great Moments in Investigations

Los Angeles, 1969:

Investigator:  Mr. Manson, we need to ask you a few questions concerning the activities of some of your associates.

Manson: We're running a social outreach program here.

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